Media Releases

CHASS has announced the winners for four categories of its prestigious Australia Prizes, which were presented at the 2016 CHASS Australia Prizes Dinner in Melbourne on October 20. Klaus Neumann, Across the Seas: Australia’s Response to Refugees: A History (Black Inc. Books) won the 2016 CHASS Australia Prize for a Book. I Am a Miracle (Malthouse Theatre) won the 2016 CHASS Australia Prize for Distinctive Work. Kate Fitz-Gibbon and Sarah Holland-Batt won the 2016 CHASS Australia Prize for a Future Leader. Gemma Hamilton (Deakin University) won the 2016 CHASS Australia Prize for a Student.

CHASS’s new book Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences: It’s everyone’s business was formally launched at the event. Edited by CHASS President Professor Joseph M. Siracusa and published by Routledge, the pocket book features a range of essays by prominent Australian and international researchers, illustrating the diverse ways in which HASS disciplines provide essential services to citizens in all walks of life. Other highlights of the evening included a keynote address by singer, writer, artistic director, and public advocate for the arts, Robyn Archer AO FAHA CdOAL, who has also written the Foreword to the book.

For the 2016 CHASS Australia Prize for a Book, the shortlisted titles are Frank Bongiorno, The Eighties: The Decade That Transformed Australia (Black Inc. Books), Klaus Neumann, Across the Seas – Australia’s Response to Refugees: A History (Black Inc. Books), and Brenda Niall, Mannix (Text Publishing). For the 2016 CHASS Australia Prize for Distinctive Work, the shortlisted entries are I Am a Miracle by Malthouse Theatre, Cut the Sky by Marrugeku Theatre, and Am I by Shaun Parker & Company. For the 2016 CHASS Australia Prize for a Future Leader, the shortlisted nominees are Dr. Kate Fitz-Gibbon, Monash University criminologist and senior lecturer, Jeffrey Jay Fowler, Black Swan State Theatre Company, and Sarah Holland-Batt, poet and writer. For the 2016 CHASS Australia Prize for a Student, the shortlisted nominees are Riddhi Blackley, Gemma Hamilton (Deakin University), and Natalie Lynch (Griffith University).

The longlisted titles, from an entry field of 132 print and ebooks in the non-fiction category are: The Story of Australia’s People Volume 1: The Rise and Fall of Ancient Australia, by Geoffrey Blainey and published by Penguin Books; The Eighties: The Decade That Transformed Australia, by Frank Bongiorno and published by Black Inc. Books; Thea Astley: Inventing Her Own Weather, by Karen Lamb and published by University of Queensland Press; Australia’s Boldest Experiment War and Reconstruction in the 1940s, by Stuart Macintyre and published by NewSouth Books; Illicit Love Interracial Sex & Marriage in the United States & Australia, by Ann McGrath and published by University of Nebraska Press; Across the Seas Australia’s Response to Refugees: A History, by Klaus Neumann and published by Black Inc Books; Mannix, by Brenda Niall and published by Text Publishing; and Sex, Soldiers and the South Pacific 1939-45: Queer Identities in Australia in the Second World War, by Yorick Smaal and published by Palgrave Macmillan.

Alan Atkinson, The Europeans in Australia Volume Three: Nation (NewSouth Publishing) won the 2015 CHASS Australia Prize for a Book. Pinocchio (Windmill Theatre and State Theatre Company SA) won the 2015 CHASS Australia Prize for Distinctive Work. Finegan Kruckemeyer won the 2015 CHASS Australia Prize for a Future Leader. Hayley Megan French (The University of Sydney) won the 2015 CHASS Australia Prize for a Student.

For the 2015 CHASS Australia Prize for a Book, the shortlisted titles are Alan Atkinson, The Europeans in Australia: Volume Three: Nation (NewSouth Publishing); Carolyn Holbrook, ANZAC: The Unauthorised Biography (NewSouth Publishing); and Tim Low, Where Song Began (Penguin Books Australia). For the 2015 CHASS Australia Prize for Distinctive Work, the shortlisted entries are Black Diggers/Queensland Theatre Company, Pinocchio/Rosemary Myers (Windmill Theatre and State Theatre Company of South Australia), and This girl laughs/Finegan Kruckemeyer. The War That Changed Us/Electric Pictures and Gapuwiyak Calling/Miyarrka Media have received honourable mentions by the jury. For the 2015 CHASS Australia Prize for a Future Leader, the shortlisted nominees are Lina Andonovska, Finegan Kruckemeyer, and Dr Thom van Dooren. For the 2015 CHASS Australia Prize for a Student, the shortlisted nominees are Alexandra Roginski (Australian National University), Betty Sergeant (RMIT University) and Hayley Megan French (The University of Sydney).

The shortlisted titles, from an entry field of 94 print and e-books in the non-fiction category and a longlist of eight titles, are Alan Atkinson, The Europeans in Australia: Volume Three: Nation (NewSouth Publishing); Carolyn Holbrook, ANZAC: The Unauthorised Biography (NewSouth Publishing); and Tim Low, Where Song Began (Penguin Books Australia).

The Council of the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences President, Professor Sue Willis welcomed the Prime Minister’s announcement of changes to the Ministry and Cabinet.’The decision to re-integrate science and research with higher education under an expanded Departmen …

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A draft National Cultural Policy framework will be released by the Federal Government this month outlining reforms to Australia’s commitment to the arts, its creative industries and the broader areas of cultural life and value in innovation and heritage and social cohes …

The Council for the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences and Academy of Social Sciences in Australia welcomes the government’s decision to drop prescriptive journal rankings in the ERA assessment exercise. …

The Council for the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences (CHASS) welcomes government funding to implement the Inspiring Australia science engagement strategy. …

The Council for the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences President Professor Sue Willis today welcomed the appointment of Professor Ian Chubb as Chief Scientist for Australia. …

The Presidents of the Council for the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences (CHASS) and the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia (ASSA) jointly welcome the recent decision by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences to establish a national Commission on the Humaniti …

The Council for the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences Board has flagged four issues for action for the new term of Government and urges candidates and parties contesting the 2010 election to set clear directions for innovation, research and cultural policy. …

The Council for the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences today welcomed the Group of Eight’s Review of Education in Mathematics, Data Science and Quantitative Disciplines, and its frank acknowledgement of the problems caused by the fall in mathematics pa …

The Council for the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences believes the new science communications strategy, Inspiring Australia (released February 8) opens the way for a strong and open relationship between science and society, CHASS President, Professor Linda Rosenman …

The Rudd Government has used the 2009 Federal Budget to deliver on its commitment to productivity growth through investment in research and innovation. …

Australia is failing to capitalize on the ability of its researchers in the most fundamental area: their power to solve problems. A new report from the Council for the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences (CHASS), calls for a three-prong solution to this issue. …

Good news for the tertiary sector is the creation of the Education Investment Fund (EIF) of $11 billion. Both the interest and capital from this fund will be used to restore crumbling infrastructure in the university system. …

CHASS welcomes the Government’s announcement yesterday (Tuesday) about Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA), the new system to assess research quality in the university sector. …

Federal Labor today released a comprehensive arts policy framework, New Directions for the Arts. New Directions for the Arts represents the most detailed arts policy document released by either side of politics in the lead up to the election, and confi …